Iceberg_As_Metaphor_for_Process

We got this one wrong, us the IT people. We view process through a rather narrow prism, so much that we grew to value “Individuals and Interactions over Processes and Tools”. But process is way more than just a set of activities that get executed in a specific order. 

Wikipedia alone has about 40 different disambiguation values when looking up “Process”. But the most concise definition is the following: “A process is a set of activities that interact to achieve a result”.

In many ways when we talk about a process we omit the latter part: “that interact to achieve a result”.

Start with basics

Take chemical processes, as an analogy. Say you want to make mayonnaise. You take an egg, oil, lemon, mustard, seasoning, and combine them in a very specific order. Should you change the order to activities, you might spoil the process, and get something, which might be tasty, but is ultimately not mayonnaise. That’s the set of activities involved in the process.

But the ingredients also interact to cause a certain set of chemical reactions. Without those interactions you will not have a mayonnaise, either. For example, if you used a boiled egg or a stale lemon, you are unlikely to achieve the desired result.

What more, if you get the ingredients and do -nothing-, other unplanned (and undesired) additional chemical processes will interact and prevent you from using those same ingredients for your desired gourmet mayonnaise. Your egg will go off, your lemon will become moldy, well, you get the point.

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“A good Scrum master can serve a few teams. A great Scrum Master will serve only one”.

rephrasing Michael James

 

There’s an ongoing debate on whether a team needs a full time Scrum master for the long run or not. Many teams feels that the duties of SM only fills a part of his day, and therefore he can do more than "just be a Scrum Master”.  In some cases the expectation from the SM was to pick up tasks like any team member, in other cases the SM was working with 2 or 3 teams in parallel, and in other teams spread the roles of the SM between various team members (and not having a dedicated person as the SM).  And there are of course many more options.

and honestly speaking, all are valid solutions that can be really effective. What I did learn over the years though, is that no matter how you approach this, you should always keep in mind the following when you decide on how to approach this:

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